Summer is Here

Summer is Here

CWQA urges parents to “Watch Kids Around Water”

Keeping Kids Safe

Pools, lakes, ponds, and beaches mean summer fun and cool relief from hot weather. But water also can be dangerous for kids if you don’t take the proper precautions. Most drownings occur in home swimming pools. It is the second leading cause of accidentaldeath for people between the ages of 5 and 24.The good news is there are many ways to keep your kids safe in the water and make sure that they take the right precautions when they’re on their own. Kids need constant supervision around water — whether the water is in a bathtub, a wading pool, an ornamental fish pond, a swimming pool, a spa, the beach, or a lake. Young children are especially vulnerable — they can drown in less than 2 inches (6 centimeters) of water. That means drowning can happen where you’d least expect it — the sink, the toilet bowl, fountains, buckets, inflatable pools, or small bodies of standing water around your home, such as ditches filled with rainwater. Always watch children closely when they’re in or near any water. All kids need to be supervised in the water, no matter what their swimming skill levels. And infants, toddlers, and weak swimmers should have an adult swimmer within arm’s reach to provide”touch supervision.” Don’t forget the sunscreen and reapply frequently, especially if the kids are getting wet. UV sunglasses, hats, and protective clothing can also help provide sun protection. Kids should drink plenty of fluids, particularly water, to prevent dehydration. It’s easy to get dehydrated in the sun, especially when kids are active and sweating. Dizziness, feeling lightheaded, or nausea are just some of the signs of dehydration and overheating.

Some Quick Tips:

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Never leave small children alone near any water container.

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Close bathroom doors and secure toilet lids with lid locks.

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Never leave a baby alone in a bath for any reason.

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Make sure small children can’t leave the house through pet doors or unlocked doors to reach pools or lakes.

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Secure swimming pool access, including by using fences, latching gates and water surface alarms.

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Completely remove the pool cover when the pool is in use.

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Store water toys away from water when not in use so they don’tattract small children.

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Keep emergency numbers handy and learn

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Ensure that a properly fitted life jacket is on your child when swimming

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